Tag Archives: Property rights

15 years on, Siwatibau’s wisdom on land tenure in his SPLTC Symposium welcome address remains as valid as ever.

Transforming Land Conflict – FAO/USP/RICS Foundation South Pacific Land Conflict Symposium Welcome Address by the late Savenaca Siwatibau, Vice Chancellor, University of the South Pacific – 10 April 2002.

The video can also be viewed in YouTube at  https://youtu.be/gvjpFG9mCK0

Caveat: this was recorded live in Fiji in 2002 on VHS – the video aspect is 4:3 and there has been some deterioration in the magnetic tape so please be patient with screen flickers.

The full transcript is available Savenaca Siwatibau – Welcome Address – SPLTC Symposium – Full Transcript (opens PDF).

The Symposium ‘Declaration and Resolutions’ is available her SPLTC Symposium – Official Declaration and Resolutions (opens PDF).

Fiji parties urged to outline land policy ahead of poll – ABC News 24

 

Following on from his 7th June editorial in the Fiji Times, Professor Spike Boydell has been interviewed by ABC correspondent Sean Dorney for this item on ABC News 24 ‘The World’, which first aired on 24 June 2014. It also includes comments from the Attorney General Aiyaz Sayad-Khaiyum and Prof Satish Chand.  The link to the piece on the ABC website is available here.

Boydell ABC with logo“What people want is stability and land is central to that stability.” (Spike Boydell)

 

Call for Land Policies ahead of Fiji Elections – ABC Pacific Beat

Professor Spike Boydell has been interviewed on ABC Radio Australia about the need for political parties in Fiji to explain their land policies ahead of the elections.  A transcript of the interview is available here.  The full piece on ABC Radio Australia – Pacific Beat – first aired on 24 June 2013 is available here.

Why land is central to Fiji’s future stability

FT 'Time Bomb' imageWith 100 days to go to the Fiji elections in September, none of the political parties have yet explained in their manifesto’s how they will deal with land (indeed, where are the manifesto’s?).  In his feature editorial in the Fiji Times on Saturday 7th June, Spike Boydell highlights that being clear on land issues, having equitable leases that are fit for purpose at market rents, and respecting the paramountcy of iTaukei land – the vanua – is central to long term economic and political stability in Fiji.

Read the full article here.

Pacific Regional Symposium – Land and Property Rights in the South Pacific – Honiara 5-7 August 2014

Symposium image flyer

CLS members Spike Boydell, Ulai Baya and John Sheehan are co-facilitating the Pacific Regional Symposium – Land and Property Rights in the South Pacific – Honiara 5-7 August 2014 (flyer & registration form) with Mike McDermott.

This Symposium is a joint initiative of the Commonwealth Association of Surveying and Land Economy (CASLE), the University of Technology, Sydney: Asia-Pacific Centre for Complex Real Property Rights (UTS: APCCRPR) and the International Academic Association for Planning Law and Property Rights (IAAPLPR). It is being hosted by the Solomon Islands Ministry of Lands, Housing and Surveys.  It has been made possible through a small grant from the Commonwealth Foundation and the support of the Ministry of Lands, Housing and Surveys.

This is the second regional Land and Property Rights symposium co-facilitated by the UTS: APCCRPR and the IAAPLPR.

Please click on the highlighted text above, or the image on the left for more information.

The CLS site will be the digital repository for the symposium resources and video record of the event.  If you are unable to attend, but would like to be notified when the resources are online, please complete the following contact form:

Imagine, if you will, what might change in terms of our identity as citizens if Australia were to become a Republic – something that many see as inevitable, albeit a situation which is yet to become a reality. I’m not talking here about the tokenism of a new flag or a contemporary national anthem, or even in the transfer of proxy leadership from a Governor General as representative of the English Crown to a President as representative of the Federation of States and Territories. Rather, my interest lies in what happens to the superior interest in land and the associated subsidiary property rights when (rather than if) Australia becomes a Republic, and what the ramifications are for notions of identity… if we replace the Crown and the Crown’s superior interest in the land with something, and if that something is an acknowledgement of the guardianship of the land through Aboriginal and Torres Straight Islander stewardship, would this, could this, or should this affect the underlying way that we as 21st century citizens relate to real property.

In his recently published chapter – A 21st Century Citizen in a brave new Republic – Spike Boydell explores how Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander native title could be prioritised over freehold land if, or when, Australia becomes a Republic.